The Suitcase

Over the course of several decades, my placid husband routinely morphed into a growling bear when he had to lift my suitcase into or out from a car, train, bus, or baggage carousel. He simply didn't understand the concept that a woman might want to have a choice of outfits in a foreign location, since he felt perfectly fine throwing a few shirts and pairs of pants into his smaller and lighter bag. Accepting most of my behaviors with grace, he had the one flaw of refusing to embrace my penchant for overpacking.

I, on the other hand, would grow petulant that he continued to make a sour face year after year as he heaved said luggage about, occasionally with distinct distain.

Fast forward to my favorite topic, the news. If anyone has seen footage of millions of refugees streaming over desert landscapes, mountain passes, or winding their way through jungles - at best with a suitcase in hand but more often with the clothes on their back - one comes to appreciate the insanity of overabundance. 

What would you bring if you had to leave your home postehaste, perhaps never to return?





Comments

  1. Interesting question. At first I start thinking about what to take that I could throw in the car....my pets, pictures, glasses, comfortable clothing, prescription, cell phone, iPad, chargers. Then I considered what to take if I had to carry it all....maybe I should leash-train the felines? All of a sudden I realize that everything alive and breathing would be my priority and the "possessions" could be replaced. Even the irreplaceable photographs have a place in my memory. I often think of the possessions I hold dear...how someday they will be in the dump. They only hold a place in time.

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  2. passport, kindle, notebook, changes of clothes

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  3. I think I told you that our refugees showed up with five suitcases for one couple with a single toddler!

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